Walls of Jerusalem to Solomons Throne, Tasmania

The Walls of Jerusalem National Park offers a wilderness experience in a day walk, and the highlight of the park are the cliffs of the same name, including our target for the day, Solomons Throne (1470m).

Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne

The Walls of Jerusalem National Park is a favourite for many people, and yet you can only reach the best scenery by walking in, so it’s a lot quieter than nearby Cradle Mountain. Once you have ascended up through eucalypt forest the alpine scenery starts with numerous tarns, Richea Scoparia (past flowering stage when we visited, but still nice), pencil pines, cliffs, and the cutest, fluffiest wallabies you could ever hope to meet. We chose to walk up the peak known as Solomons Throne (1470m), but if you have time you can also ascend The Temple (1446m) and Mount Jerusalem (1459m). Nearby King Davids Peak (1499m) provides some good photo opportunities. It’s all very biblical.

Track notes at the end.

Walls of Jerusalem to Solomons Throne: The Scenery

Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
A big old tree as we emerged from of the eucalypt forest, near the old trappers hut.

Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne

Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
A couple of the tarns from a group called Solomons Jewels.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
Another of the tarns known as Solomons Jewels.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
The spent flowers of Richea Scoparia with a pencil pine in the distance.

Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne

Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
The Walls of Jerusalem in the distance, specifically King Davids Peak.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
Near the Wild Dog Creek campsite.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
Approaching Lake Salome.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
King Davids Peak (1499m). I took lots of photos of this mountain, which is the highest in the area.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
Sophia backed by King Davids Peak.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
Mt Jerusalem over a field of Richea Scoparia; past its prime but still attractive in this rust red colour.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
Mt Jerusalem.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
Solomons Throne is at the end of these cliffs.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
Cuteness overload! A very fluffy baby wallaby, well suited to the alpine conditions.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
Spongy alpine plants are a favourite of mine.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
A patchwork of alpine plants.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
King Davids Peak
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
Approaching Solomons Throne (1470m).
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
The way up to Solomons Throne.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
King Davids Peak and Lake Salome.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
The Temple (1446) and behind Mt Jerusalem (1459m).

Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne

Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
A panorama from the summit.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
Sophia admiring the view from Solomons Peak.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
Returning from the summit.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
A moody peak in the distance.
Walls of Jerusalem National Park to Solomons Throne
A random bush (or young tree) back down in eucalypt the forest.

Track Notes

We used track notes in Day Walks Tasmania, but the track is obvious the whole way, except you need to know roughly when to take a right turn up to Solomons Throne (my photos should help). There’s also information on the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service website (which is down right now so I won’t link to it, but you can look it up).

Author: Edward Hathway

I'm a clinical psychologist and keen hiker.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.