Trig M from Starvation Gully, Korowai Torlesse Tussocklands Park, Canterbury NZ

Snowy scenes & views of Lake Lyndon and many other peaks on this shorter walk up to Trig M (1251m) from Starvation Gully.

Trig M from Starvation Gully, Korowai Torlesse Tussocklands Park

A repeat trip to Trig M, this time the shorter route from Starvation Gully, mainly to see the area after fairly heavy snowfall. It’s a fairly steady 1.5-2 hour climb to the top, with most of the ascent achieved early on. The views are very good, particularly of Lake Lyndon and towards the Craigieburn Range. Trig M can also be climbed from the other side of Porters Pass on the Coach Stream Track – that is a bit longer but more interesting (except for the section through farmland). 

Track notes at the end.

Trig M from Starvation Gully: The Scenery

Trig M from Starvation Gully, Korowai Torlesse Tussocklands Park
Sophia enjoying the snow and sunny weather.

 

Trig M from Starvation Gully, Korowai Torlesse Tussocklands Park
It was sunny to start, but clouded over a bit later.

 

Trig M from Starvation Gully, Korowai Torlesse Tussocklands Park
Looking over Lake Lyndon towards the Craigieburn Range.

 

Trig M from Starvation Gully, Korowai Torlesse Tussocklands Park
Lake Lyndon and Mt Lyndon.

 

Trig M from Starvation Gully, Korowai Torlesse Tussocklands Park
A panorama south-west from the summit of Trig M (1251m).

 

Trig M from Starvation Gully, Korowai Torlesse Tussocklands Park
Looking east. There was a little snow left on the Canterbury Plains around Springfield.

Trig M from Starvation Gully, Korowai Torlesse Tussocklands Park

Trig M from Starvation Gully, Korowai Torlesse Tussocklands Park
Returning here.

 

Trig M from Starvation Gully, Korowai Torlesse Tussocklands Park
I liked this patchwork of scree, tussock and snow.

Track Notes

There’s a vehicle layby besides SH73, on the Lake Lyndon side of Porters Pass going down the hill (from Christchurch). From there it’s up a vehicle track to eventually meet the Coach Stream Track, and then further up to the summit. It’s all pretty steady walking and easy to navigate. It’ll take about 2.5-3 hours return.  There’s more information on walks in the area in this DOC brochure.

Author: Edward Hathway

I'm a clinical psychologist and keen hiker.

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