Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon, South Korea

Obongsan (Five Peaks Mountain) is a suburban mountain (actually a hill at just 105m of elevation) situated in an obscure spot in southern Incheon that just happens to be close to my Mother-in-law’s apartment. It’s actually quite a nice walk, but perhaps not one to seek out unless you live nearby.

Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon

Obongsan (Five Peaks Mountain) is a diminutive mountain (in other words a hill) in southern Incheon, very close to my Mother-in-law’s place. We went up a few times to work off our holiday indulgences, and I imagine only locals would visit. A convenient and pleasant way to get outdoors and keep fit if you happen to live in the area.

Track Notes

The walk from where we start to the last of the five peaks and back takes about an hour or so for a reasonably fit walker. (It’s possible to walk down the other side and there’s at least one other exit from the mountain along the way). There are actually some very steep sections, so although I give it an easy rating, that’s just because it’s shortish: it’s not for the infirm or unsteady.  We started at this point shown on Google Maps.

The Scenery

Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon
The start of the walk, with typical Korean apartment buildings for contrast.
Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon
Squirrels out. I had to chase him or her to get this shot.
Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon
Squirrel food.
Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon
From the last of the five peaks. The track continues to descend the mountain on the other side. We usually turn around and go back.
Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon
At our turnaround point. There are preserved wetlands down there.
Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon
These sorts of resting places are located here and there in Korea. Sophia and our nephew pictured here.
Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon
A natural spring. There were people filling big bottles and canisters with the very tasty water that was flowing freely. This area is an obvious side trip off the main track.
Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon
A traditional grave site along the route.
Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon
Korean hikers all sporting the latest gear, and they wear all of it no matter how warm it is.

I really respect the fact that Koreans like to hike, including lots of fairly elderly people. But I do get frustrated when, for example, on a day when I sweated like a pig in just a t-shirt, most other hikers wore jackets, and some even wore masks and gloves to protect them from the hazy, dappled post-autumnal equinox 9:30am sunlight. FFS!

Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon
You can just see the sea in this photo – distant centre.
Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon
This electronic signboard spoke to us as we passed, freaking me out in the process.
Obongsan, Nonhyeon-dong, Incheon
Koreans don’t mess around with their hiking facilities. This small mountain attracts so many hikers that they have installed boot cleaning facilities at the start.

Author: Edward Hathway

I'm a clinical psychologist and keen hiker.

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