Narrawallee Creek Nature Reserve Circuit, near Ulladulla NSW

A very pleasant walk through open forest, along long beaches and over colourful rocky headlands. And you’ll likely come across various birdlife along the way.

Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit

This circuit walk in Narrawallee Creek Nature Reserve exceeded expectations. It starts in fairly open forest and heads towards the coast, then passes through an area containing many cycads, ancient and attractive plants that predate conifers on the evolutionary timeline. It then runs south along Conjola Beach to the many colourful rocks on Buckley’s Point, further on to Narrawallee Creek itself, and then back to the start through a variety of open forest. There’s various bird life along the way, including sea birds nesting along Narrawallee Creek, and black cockatoos in the forest bordering the creek.
Track notes at the end.

Narrawallee Creek Nature Reserve Circuit: The Scenery

Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
Forest at the start.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
A lot of the walking I do in Australia is through thick forest. This more open forest is therefore a bit of a novelty for me.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
Coastal forest that was a bit different than the usual.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
Cycad cones. These plants have an ancient lineage, pre-dating conifers in evolutionary terms.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
A cycad forest.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
Conjola Beach looking south.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
I liked these dune flowers. They were new to me.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
A close up of those flowers.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
Sooty Oystercatchers
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
Quite a bit of this walk was along the beach.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
My wife Sophia identified these as mangrove seeds. There were lots washed up on the beach from nearby groves, but this one caught my eye because it was sprouting.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
Looking north back along Conjola Beach.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
Conjola Beach from Buckley’s Point.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
Lots of interesting rocks on Buckley’s Point.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
Sophia checking out the views from Buckley’s Point.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
I liked the colourful rocks on Buckley’s Point.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
A shell midden.

Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit

Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
Following the path taken by some of the locals.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
Narrawallee Creek where it meets the sea.
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
This bird came over to scare me off her impossibly cute chicks. Pretty ballsy. I didn’t act fast enough to photograph the chicks unfortunately.

Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit

Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
There were these plants growing on top of trees, especially stumps left over from logging.

Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit

Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
Narrawallee Creek
Narrawallee Nature Creek Circuit
A bog. It looked like if I fell into it I would be sucked into a subterranean underworld, or maybe another dimension. Or I might just get wet and dirty.

Track Notes

There’s a small network of trails in the reserve and hence a few options you can take, but we followed variations of walks described in two of our books – Take a Walk in Southern NSW & the ACT and Best Bush, Coast and Village Walks of The Shoalhaven.

We started at a small car park near the start of Buckley’s Point Trail, and continued to near the coast, where we took a left turn onto the Burrawang Walking Track. We continued on this track through the cycads and at the end turned right onto Conjola Beach. We walked south along Conjola Beach past Buckley’s Point to Narrawallee Creek. At the creek you pick up the Mangrove Track just a bit inland, and keep left on this track to arrive back at Buckley’s Point Trail quite near the start, which is to the left.  On this return leg you can have a look at the creek which is to the left at a small clearing about half way along.

You can see all of these tracks on the Google Map below so it’s pretty straightforward finding your way. And there’s information about the reserve on the NPWS website.

Author: Edward Hathway

I'm a clinical psychologist and keen hiker.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.