Mother Cummings Peak ascent, North Tasmania

A sometimes steep walk through attractive beech forest and past the tree line onto the top of the Great Western Tiers at Mother Cummings Peak (1260m).

Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania

Although a bit misty on the day we did it, this walk up onto the Great Western Tiers to the summit of Mother Cummings Peak (1260m) offers good views over the tiers, as well as attractive beech forest, rocky stream beds, and alpine vegetation up on the summit plateau. There’s also a small waterfall along the way.

Track notes at the end.

Mother Cummings Peak ascent: The Scenery

Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
Mother Cummings Rivulet at the start of the walk.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
A pretty cool fungus. Looks a bit like a meringue.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
Sophia surrounded by moss.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
I took a lot of pictures of mossy rocks and trees.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
I think this is the second crossing over Mother Cummings Rivulet, the first being at the very start.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
More moss.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
Yet more moss. This is what happens to my photography when the views are obscured by mist.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
A small falls before the steep ascent begins through boulder fields. This is 20-30 metres further on the from where the main track veers right.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
I liked a lot of the plants on this walk.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
Another cool fungus.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
Nice colours.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
Entering boulder fields.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
Nearing the summit plateau here.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
Well above the tree line now.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
Looking over the east side of the summit plateau here. That may be Quamby Bluff on the left.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
Looking west from the summit over the Great Western Tiers. I just got this shot before the mist closed in even more.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
Lichen. I lichen it.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
Heading back down into forest.
Mother Cummings Peak ascent, Tasmania
Moss and lichen (or something; can it be lichen on a tree?). In case you hadn’t see enough already.

Track Notes

From the end of Smoko Road it’s a straight up and down walk and the track is obvious enough except when you get onto the plateau, where you should probably use a compass to work out your route. We got a bit lost and wasted time finding our way to the summit cairn, (which is approximately 200m directly south once you get up onto the plateau), and the the views south-west over the Great Western Tiers were by then a bit misty as the clouds rolled in.

You can in fact make a small loop for variation at the lower end of the track. We took the old road that continues on the other side of Mother Cummings Rivulet (which was dry), then right at a large clearing containing an old wooden sign. The track continues on to cross back over Mother Cummings Rivulet, (where there is a junction with the track we used on the way down), then on to Smoko Falls, which is a short deviation off the track just as it begins to ascend into rockier country. It’s then a steep climb up onto the alpine plateau through sections of scrub and boulders.

On the way back we took a left at that junction just before the track crosses Mother Cummings Rivulet, and this alternate tracks takes you down to the car park (although from memory I think it joined the old road very near the end).

Our notes in Day Walks Tasmania included a side trip to Chasm Falls, but there is no longer a bridge over Smoko Creek so crossing this would require some navigation upstream to a safe point. We were happy enough just to summit the mountain.

Author: Edward Hathway

I'm a clinical psychologist and keen hiker.

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