Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston, Otago NZ

A walk at the southern end of Lake Wakatipu to the summit of Lorn Peak (1638m). Excellent views, including over the lake the whole way.

Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston

The route to Lorn Peak (1638m) takes you at first through farmland, then into the attractive tussock and alpine Remarkables Conservation Area. There are great views over the southern end of Lake Wakatipu all of the way from Kingston up to Queenstown. From the summit there are views up and down the Hector Mountains, and west over the Nevis Valley and Garvie Mountains.

It’s fairly easy if sometimes steep walking most of the way, and is the only proper sized tramp I know of in this area. Consequently it provides a unique perspective on the southern end of Lake Wakatipu. There is also a short walk starting in Kingston called the Shirt Tail Track.

Track notes at the end.

Lorn Peak ascent: The Scenery

Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Early morning light on our way up.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
We actually lost the track here – it actually goes off to the right. It made a nice photo though.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Patchworked light was a feature of our walk.

Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston

Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Looking up into the Remarkables Conservation Area.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Crossing into the Remarkables Conservation area. The light went a bit flat at this point, but it livened up soon afterwards.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
I liked these alpine plants higher up on the tops.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Getting up close to the summit.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
A panorama north from the summit of Lorn Peak (1638m).
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Looking over the Nevis Valley and Garvie Mountains.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Looking over the Nevis Valley and Garvie Mountains.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Sophia waiting in a less windy spot for me to finish my photography.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Point 1648m
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
The light was constantly changing.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Another nice alpine plant.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
The northern end of the Hector Mountains. We visited a viewpoint over Lake Hope over there in the summer – that was a fabulously rugged spot, and very different from the rolling tussock slopes of Lorn Peak and surrounds.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Lake Wakatipu looking a bit dark and foreboding at this point. It was soon to have magical patches of bright light – that pic to come.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Sophia backed by the distant Eyre Mountains.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Moody scenes in the hills south-west of Kingston.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
The tops of the Eyre Mountains at the back.

Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston

Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
I took quite a few pictures towards these hills to the south-west.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Lake Wakatipu starting to light up.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
A panorama from Kingston at the southern end of Lake Wakatipu up to Queenstown, where the lake bends west.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
I think Lake Wakatipu looks like it is covered with a cloud inversion here, but the lighting was just getting weird.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Lake Wakatipu in dappled afternoon light.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Calming scenes over towards Southland.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
Kingston down there at the bottom end of the lake.
Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
A cafe/bar in the old train station building in Kingston.


Track Notes

Lorn Peak ascent, Kingston
On a grassy vehicle track through farmland, then onwards into the Remarkables Conservation Area. When the track runs out you can head up the fence line through tussock and then sparse alpine vegetation all the way to the summit.

The route starts on a grassy vehicle track through farmland, then onwards into the Remarkables Conservation Area. When the track runs out you can head up the fence line through tussock and then sparse alpine vegetation all the way to the summit. Probably 5-6 hours all up; about 12km and 1260m of ascent and descent. I originally got this walk idea from the Wild Things website, which is a trail running site, but also great for tramping ideas and track notes.

Author: Edward Hathway

I'm a clinical psychologist and keen hiker.

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