Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass, Canterbury/Otago NZ

Walk along a ridgeline from Lindis Pass (971m) to Longslip Mountain (1494m) surrounded by the famous tussock grasslands of the area.

Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass

The area around Lindis Pass is famous for its golden tussock grasslands. You can see them from the highway, and can climb to excellent views on Double Peak in less than two hours return. But to really get amongst it all consider a day-walk to Longslip Mountain from the lookout car park. It’s pretty much one long ridge all the way to the summit, and with some of the best views early on you could shorten your day and still leave very satisfied.

I can recommend getting an early start for this walk, as morning light will really accentuate the ridgelines and saturate the golden colours. By late morning it was all looking a bit flat and pale. It may also be good in the evening, although I’ve never been there at that time. (We started around 9am in early Feb, and probably had an hour of good light.) 

The unmarked route is mostly straightforward – along one long ridge mainly – but there are a few spots of steep and somewhat rocky terrain in the middle section. Nothing too crazy. I’d say a good introduction to off-track hiking for those wanting the practice. Have a look at my route notes at the end.

Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass: The Scenery

Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass
Taken very near the start, you can see a fair bit of the route ahead. The summit is actually to the right, and you can see the landslide that gives the mountain its name (I presume). That point in the middle is probably 1415m – after this the route drops a bit before gradually climbing back up to the summit.
Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass
Mmm, that’s good lighting.
Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass
Double Peak at the back (right) which we climbed in winter. This is one way to get quick views of the area.
Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass
One of my favourite shots of the day, when the light was just right. Double Peak at the back.

Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass

Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass
Another one looking back at Double Peak. I took a few.
Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass
The sun was climbing higher and I was just starting to lose the excellent lighting of early morning. Still nice but you can see the colours are less saturated and the ridges less defined.
Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass
Looking NW into the backcountry.
Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass
Looking back along our outward route, possibly from 1415m here.
Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass
Sophia on the ridge, lit up by the sun. Point 1534m is prominent.

Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass

Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass
Views north from the summit of Longslip Mountain (1494m).
Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass
Dromedary Hill is in the mid-ground to the left. We had climbed that three years earlier.
Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass
Flat light on our way back, but still nice terrain.

Route Notes

Longslip Mountain from Lindis Pass
Park at the lookout car park, just on the Canterbury side of Lindis Pass. Cross over the road and head up onto the obvious ridge. Then it’s pretty much straight up this easy ridge, with just a few rocky sections along the way. Eventually you’ll meet an old farm track, which you can follow for a while. Then leave this to climb up onto the flattish tops for the last few hundred metres to the summit. Return the way you came.

You can park at the lookout car park, just on the Canterbury side of Lindis Pass. Cross over the road, jump the barrier, and head up onto the obvious ridge. (That climb is short but very steep – you could walk up the road to Lindis Pass, as it is less steep from there). Then it’s pretty much straight up this easy, undulating ridge (the Canterbury-Otago border), with just a few rocky sections along the way.

Eventually you’ll meet an old farm track, which you can follow for a while. Then leave this to climb up onto the flattish tops for the last few hundred metres to the summit. Return the way you came.

Other walks in the area include the short climb to Double Peak, and also Dromedary Hill on the Canterbury side. For more information on the Lindis Conservation Area see the DOC website

Author: Edward Hathway

I'm a clinical psychologist and keen hiker.

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