Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area, Omarama NZ

The Dromedary Hill Track takes you initially over farmland, then up through the Lindis Conservation Area to the summit at 1664m, where there are views of countless other peaks.

Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area

During a stay in Twizel Aoraki Mt Cook National Park had fairly average weather for a couple of days, so I looked further afield for some day walks. The Dromedary Hill Track was one of these walks, and although it isn’t the most spectacular, we didn’t meet anybody all day, and the views from up high were very good. Initial walking is through paddocks, then it’s mostly tussock grass and other alpine and subalpine vegetation. I imagine it would make a good winter walk with some snow on the tops.

There’s a 5km approach through farmland, but you can knock that over in about an hour. Then it’s up 900 vertical metres in the Lindis Conservation Area to the summit, which sits at the end of a rising ridge. Almost all of the walking is on a vehicle track, so it’s never too challenging.  Track notes at the end.

Dromedary Hill Track: The Scenery

Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
I think this lamb was a bit slow. Even for a lamb. It seemed much smaller than other lambs and was in a field all by itself. It didn’t even walk so well. Still, cute in its way.
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
The farmland we walked through was not too bad. The first kilometre or so was cultivated and less interesting.
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
Looking back towards the start. The Wether Range in shadow.
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
Entering the Lindis Conservation Area.
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
Rolling hills.
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
Looking back towards the start.
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
The view north from up on the ridge.
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
Climbing along the ridge towards the summit.
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
A panorama from the summit of Dromedary Hill (1664m).
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
A jumble of peaks to the north-west.

Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area

Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
Looking back along our route up.
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
The Pavillion Peak Track winds its way towards the Ahuriri Valley.
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
Sophia on the summit of Dromedary Hill (1664m).
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
Looking north.
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
I liked the colours and contours on this hill.
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
Dromedary Hill as we zig zagged back down through the conservation area.
Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
Returning through farmland, some of the grasses had a nice purple hew.

Track Notes

Dromedary Hill Track, Lindis Conservation Area
The route starts on a vehicle track through farmland for 5km – sounds like a lot but it’s flat and you’ll move quickly. It’s then into the Lindis Conservation Area and a steepish climb to the ridge. At the ridge you’ll want to jump the fence to stay on the vehicle track until near the summit, when you’ll have to jump a fence or two again.

The track starts just before the Dalrachney Road Bridge if travelling from Omarama to the north. There is a rest area on the other side of the bridge where we parked our car, although there’s enough room to park near the track head.

The route is initially on vehicle track through farmland for 5km – sounds like a lot but it’s quite flat and you’ll move quickly. There are three shallow but slightly wide stream crossings and so you might get wet feet; (gaiters and boots will probably keep you dry, and walking poles always help for stability on stepping stones).

It’s then into the Lindis Conservation Area and a steepish climb to the ridge. At the ridge you’ll want to jump the fence to stay on the vehicle track until near the summit, when you’ll have to jump a fence or two again to get to the summit. There’s more information on the DOC website.

 

Author: Edward Hathway

I'm a clinical psychologist and keen hiker.

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