Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park, Tasmania

A straightforward walk that provides spectacular views of coastal cliffs on the Tasman Peninsula, Tasmania.

Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park

The Cape Hauy Track forms part of the multi-day Three Capes Track, and takes in a variety of coastal scenery, including sheer sided cliffs on Cape Hauy itself. It’s roughly a 90 minute drive from Hobart; the last section is a dirt road to the picturesque Fortescue Bay, where they have a camp ground and facilities. The first part of the walk is through forest, which then opens up to heath vegetation and views of the surrounding cliffs, the most precipitous of which are at the turnaround point of the walk. 

Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park
The locals (a wallaby) were unperturbed by my presence.

Track Notes

You walk out to the Cape and back again on a well formed and obvious track; about 9 kilometres return over undulating terrain. Here are track notes and maps from Trail Hiking Australia and Tas Trails. Our track notes in Day Walks Tasmania included an additional leg to Mt Fortescue and back, but this is no longer allowed as they now force people to walk the Three Capes Track in just one direction, so as to limit the spread of disease into wilderness areas. (It may also be because people pay to do the Three Capes Track).

The Scenery

Pictures are displayed in the order I took them.

Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park
Sophia on the Cape Hauy Track. The walk opens out about half way to the turnaround point for views of the cape.

Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park

Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park
Looking back towards the start.
Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park
A tiny rock climber on a thin column of rock known as the Totem Pole. He was descending and passed behind the rock. I didn’t realise at first that the rock he was climbing was separated from the rest. You can see that on the next two photos.
Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park
Cape Hauy with the Totem Pole bottom left, viewed from the turnaround point of the walk. I could see ropes connecting the Totem Pole to the mainland.
Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park
Cape Hauy with the Totem Pole bottom left. There were safety barriers but I still felt a bit dizzy.

Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park

Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park
Looking towards Cape Pillar.
Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park
Looking towards Cape Pillar.

Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park Cape Huay Track, Tasman National Park

Cape Hauy Track, Tasman National Park
Looking towards the start and end of the walk at Fortescue Bay.
Cape Hauy Track, Tasman National Park
Fortescue Bay. Our lunch spot at the end of the walk.
Cape Hauy Track, Tasman National Park
Nature makes such great designs.
Gratuitous beer and food shot.
Tasmanian beer and oysters. The oysters and one of the beers was from Bruny Island (a dark pale ale called Oxymoron ) – they were very tasty. We had these at an excellent street festival called Street Eats @ Franko in Hobart. It’s on from Spring to Autumn on a Friday night.

Author: Edward Hathway

I'm a clinical psychologist and keen hiker.

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